TYPICAL JAPANESE BREAKFAST

There are three meals in Japan: breakfast lunch and dinner. The breakfast, in Japanese, is called asa gohan, which stands for morning meal, and is eaten sitting cross-legged in front of a low table. For the record, we must point out that not everyone in Japan indulges in such a banquet. There are those who are satisfied with a coffee and a croissant and those who, however, still today, respecting tradition, get up well in advance to prepare the different courses planned for themselves and their family with calm and dedication. Despite the richness of the menu, the dishes are light, mostly based on nutritious but not heavy ingredients.


To understand what it is made of, the ideal would be to do it in a ryokan. The Japanese breakfast in a traditional in carries something fascinating about it. Although you may think that consuming asa gohan in a hotel cannot give you the idea of ​​quality, by going to a ryokan that is not too cheap you will have a unique experience.


But back to breakfast, one of the richest meals in Japan. Here you can eat the inevitable steamed white rice, fish, seaweed, mixed vegetables and eggs.

Among the Japanese breakfast recipes, which are perhaps less well known, are natto, obtained from the fermentation of soy beans that is generally served with steamed rice, and tamagoyaki, the famous Japanese omelette made with eggs. , soy sauce and sugar and which is cooked following a traditional technique that is a little laborious.

Another inevitable course is fish, which can be enjoyed boiled or steamed. Among those notoriously eaten in the morning are salmon (which often gives way to mackerel) and almost never tuna. The undisputed protagonist of the Japanese breakfast remains, however, the miso soup, characterized by respectable nutritional values.


As already mentioned, not all Japanese observe what is dictated by tradition. There are also those - and there are not a few - who indulge in a quick and practical breakfast, quickly enjoying milk, coffee, tea, orange juice and brioche or bread and jam, just like in the West.